Canadian Forest Service Publications

Moth diversity in a northeastern, North American, red spruce forest. II. The effect of silvicultural practices on Geometrid diversity (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) 2002. Thomas, A.W. Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, NB. Information Report M-X-213E. 25 p. (includes: Bibliography, appendix).

Year: 2002

Issued by: Atlantic Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 20515

Language: English

Series: Information Report (AFC - Fredericton)

Availability: PDF (download)

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Abstract

There was a negative correlation between the amount of timber removed and the total number of individuals trapped in a plot. There was a negative correlation between the mean daily catch of individuals and the amount of timber removed. Species richness was greatest in the plot with 30% timber removed, followed by the uncut plot, then the strip cut, and least in the plot with 100% timber removed. There was a negative correlation between the mean daily catch of species and the amount of timber removed. Seasonal species accumulation curves showed the clearcut had a 5-day lag compared with the other plots. The number of species shared between the uncut plot and a prescription was negatively correlated with the amount of timber removed. Quantitative similarity indices ranked the plots in accordance with the amount of timber removed, i.e., the more timber removed, the lower the similarity coefficient when compared with the uncut plot. Rank abundance plots were good fits to theoretical log series curves for all prescriptions, including the uncut plot. Species abundance plots took the form of truncated log normal distributions for the uncut, selection-cut, and strip-cut plots. Species abundance plots for the clearcut were typical of those of an impoverished site. McIntosh's diversity index, U, was the only diversity statistic that ranked the four plots in accordance with the severity of the prescription.