Canadian Forest Service Publications

Seasonal occurrence and spatial distribution of resinosis, a symptom of Sirex noctilio (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) injury, on boles of Pinus sylvestris (Pinaceae). 2013.Ryan, K.; de Groot, P.; Smith, S.M.; Turgeon, J.J. Canadian Entomologist. 145:117-122.

Year: 2013

Available from: Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 34414

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.4039/tce.2012.96

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Abstract

An established population of the exotic woodwasp Sirex noctilio Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) was first detected in North America in 2004. In order to develop survey guidelines for the detection of this major pest of Pinus Linnaeus species in the Southern Hemisphere, we examined 231 Pinus sylvestris biweekly to establish the timing and spatial distribution of resinosis symptoms of attack, and the timing of subsequent tree mortality. Fresh resin appeared between mid-July and late August, and on 70% of infested trees was observed on the mid bole. The occurrence of tree death varied between sites, from 2 weeks after the first detection of resinosis in one site to several months in seven other sites. Findings from our study provide key information to improve detection of S. noctilio and predict its impact on forest stands in its new range in northeastern North America.

Plain Language Summary

Sirex noctilio is an introduced woodwasp that affects Scots pine. It was first detected in North America in 2004. Affected trees will produce resin as a defense mechanism when the wasp lays its eggs. We wanted to develop better survey guidelines for this pest by identifying the timing and location of these resin symptoms and the timing of subsequent tree mortality. We examined 231 trees biweekly on eight sites throughout southern Ontario. We noted that fresh resin appeared between mid-July and late August. On 70% of trees, resin was observed on the mid bole. Once resin had been detected, time to tree death varied from two weeks to several months, depending on the site. Findings from this study will provide key information to improve woodwasp detection and survey methods and help predict its impact on forest stands in the insect’s new range.

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