Canadian Forest Service Publications

Ultrastructure of prothoracic pore structures of longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae) native to Jilin, China. 2013. Li, Y.; Meng, Q.; Sweeney, J.D.; Gao, W. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 106(5): 637–642.

Year: 2013

Issued by: Atlantic Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 35292

Language: English

Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.1603/AN12102

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Abstract

In the longhorn beetle subfamily, Cerambycinae, the presence of pore fields on the prothorax of males has been shown to be associated with the production of sex or aggregation pheromones in several species. Adult specimens of nine Cerambycine species in the Tribe Clytini native to the Jilin province (Chlorophorus sexmaculatus (Kraatz), Chlorophorus sulcaticeps Pic, Chlorophorus motschulskyi (Gangl), Cyrtoclytus capra Germar, Plagionotus pulcher Blessig, Rhaphuma acutivittis (Kraatz), Xylotrechus clarinus Bates, Xylotrechus rusticus L., and Xylotrechus cuneipennis (Kraatz)) were examined for the presence and distribution of prothoracic pore fields, by using scanning electron microscopy. For all nine species examined, porous indentations were present on the pleura or both pleura and tergum of males and were absent on females. Porous indentations on the prothorax of males varied significantly among species in both mean density (1.4-7.8 pores per 10,000 um2) and diameter (2.0-16.5 um). These results led us to hypothesize that males of these species emit sex or aggregation pheromones and that additional research to test this hypothesis and develop pheromone-based tools for their survey and monitoring is warranted.

Plain Language Summary

Pheromones are chemical compounds emitted by many animals that stimulate behavior in members of the same species, e.g., for attraction of mates over long distances, and have practical applications for survey and detection of invasive insect species. In longhorn beetles in the subfamily Cerambycinae, the production of long distance sex pheromones has been associated with special pore structures on the body of males. Not all species in this subfamily have these pore structures however. Our goal is to develop improved tools for survey of potentially damaging longhorn beetles that be inadvertently introduced to Canada via trade with countries overseas. The objective of this study was to examine specimens of several longhorn beetle species native to Jilin, China, to determine whether or not they had characteristic pore structures associated with pheromone production, and thus, whether they warranted further pheromone-related research. We found pore structures on the males of nine Cerambycine species: Chlorophorus sexmaculatus (Kraatz), Chlorophorus sulcaticeps Pic, Chlorophorus motschulskyi (Gangl), Cyrtoclytus capra Germar, Plagionotus pulcher Blessig, Rhaphuma acutivittis (Kraatz), Xylotrechus clarinus Bates, Xylotrechus rusticus L., and Xylotrechus cuneipennis(Kraatz). Pores varied significantly among species in density and diameter. These results suggest that these species likely emit and respond to long distance pheromones and that development of pheromone-based tools for their survey would have good probability of success.