Canadian Forest Service Publications

Host-tree oviposition preference of balsam fir sawfly, Neodiprion abietis (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae), in New Brunswick, Canada. 2013. Johns, R.C.; Fidgen,J.; Ostaff, D.P. The Canadian Entomologist 145:430-434.

Year: 2013

Available from: Atlantic Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 35403

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.4039/tce.2013.24

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Abstract

Laboratory experiments using field-collected females were carried out to determine the oviposition preference of the balsam fir sawfly, Neodiprion abietis (Harris) (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) in New Brunswick, Canada. Unmated adult females given no choice among host–plant foliage laid ∼98% of available eggs on balsam fir (Abies balsamea (Linnaeus) Miller; Pinaceae), but only 8% and 10%, respectively, on white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss; Pinaceae) and black spruce (Picea mariana (Miller) Britton, Sterns, and Poggenburg). Given a choice among shoots from all three hosts in the same chamber, unmated females laid all but one egg in balsam fir. Host plant had no effect on female longevity, although there were nearly four- to eightfold more empty egg slits on balsam fir needles, owing presumably to the greater activity of females on this preferred host foliage.

Plain Language Summary

Many insect pests vary regionally in host-tree preference, and knowledge of such preferences can have implications for local monitoring and pest management. Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the egg-lay preference of the balsam fir sawfly in New Brunswick, Canada. Adult females given no choice between host-plant foliage laid approximately 98% of available eggs on balsam fir, but only 8% and 10%, respectively, on white spruce and black spruce. Given a choice between shoots from all three hosts in the same chamber, females laid all but one egg in balsam fir. Host plant had no effect on female longevity.

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