Canadian Forest Service Publications

Type of intercept trap not important for capturing female Sirex noctilio and S. nigricornis (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) in North America. 2014. Haavik, L.J.; Batista, E.; Dodds, K.J.; Johnson, W.; Meeker, J.R.; Scarr, T.A.; Allison, J.D. Journal of Economic Entomology 107(3):1295-1298.

Year: 2014

Available from: Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 35610

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Abstract

Current detection tools for Sirex noctilio F. (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) in North America are poor. To determine the importance of intercept trap type for capturing females of S. noctilio and its native congener, Sirex nigricornis F., in eastern North America, we report on seven trap comparison studies from different years and geographic locations. Among studies, total numbers of S. noctilio captured were low (mean of ≤1 wasp per trap). Total numbers of S. nigricornis caught were generally greater, and ranged from a mean of 1–13 wasps per trap. Nearly all studies found no significant differences among intercept trap types in the number of woodwasps caught. For future studies, we recommend that either panel or 12-unit Lindgren funnel traps be used to catch S. noctilio or S. nigricornis in eastern North America.

Plain Language Summary

Current detection tools for Sirex noctilio in North America are poor. To determine the importance of intercept trap type for capturing females of S. noctilio and the native Sirex nigricornis in eastern North America, we report on seven trap comparison studies from different years and geographic locations. Among studies, total numbers of S. noctilio captured were low (mean of ≤1 wasp per trap). Total numbers ofS. nigricornis caught were generally greater, and ranged from a mean of 1–13 wasps per trap. Nearly all studies found no significant differences among intercept trap types in the number of woodwasps caught. For future studies, we recommend that either panel or 12-unit Lindgren funnel traps be used to catch S. noctilio or S. nigricornis in eastern North America.

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