Canadian Forest Service Publications

Further evidence that monochamol is attractive to Monochamus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) species, with attraction synergized by host plant volatiles and bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pheromones. 2014. Ryall, K.; Silk, P.; Webster, R.P.; Gutowski, J.M.; Meng, Q.; Li, Y.; Gao, W.; Fidgen, J.; Kimoto, T.; Scarr, T.Mastro, V.; Sweeney, J. Canadian Entomologist 19:16p.[in press]

Year: 2014

Available from: Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 35917

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Abstract

Monochamol (2-undecyloxy-1-ethanol) is a male-produced aggregation pheromone for several Monochamus Dejean (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) species. We conducted trapping experiments in Canada, Poland, and China to test whether monochamol was attractive to additional Monochamus species and if attraction was synergised by plant volatiles and bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pheromones. We provide the first evidence of attraction for M. urussovii (Fischer) and M. saltuarius (Gebler) to monochamol or monochamol+kairomones. The highest numbers of M. urussovii were captured in traps baited with monochamol+plant volatiles (Manuka oil, ethanol and (95/5±) α−pinene). Captures of M. saltuarius were highest in traps baited with monochamol, with the addition of cubeb oil tending to reduce captures. The highest numbers of M. scutellatus (Say) were captured in traps baited with monochamol+kairomones. A similar pattern in trap captures was found for M. notatus (Drury), M. marmorator Kirby, M. carolinensis (Olivier), and M. mutator LeConte. Detection rates, that is, proportion of traps capturing at least one specimen, was highest for traps baited with monochamol plus kairomones, particularly for less-common species. These results support the emerging hypothesis that pheromone compounds can attract related cerambycid species with cumulative evidence for attraction to monochamol for 12 species of Monochamus worldwide.

Plain Language Summary

Some insect species in the Monochamus genus are serious pests of coniferous host trees because larval tunnelling can significantly decrease the value of logs for lumber. There is concern that some of these species will be introduced to new geographic locations through international trade. We carried out experiments to increase our understanding of their chemical ecology, which can be used to develop lures for use in detection and monitoring programmes. We conducted trapping experiments in Canada, Poland, and China to test whether monochamol (a male-produced aggregation pheromone) was attractive to additional Monochamus species and if attraction was synergised by plant volatiles and bark beetle pheromones. The pheromone significantly influenced mean trap captures of several Monochamus species and the attraction was increased and sometimes synergised when combined with host plant chemicals. We showed the first evidence of attraction for two species to these traps. Our results support the emerging hypothesis that pheromone compounds can attract related species.

Date modified: