Canadian Forest Service Publications

Further contributions to the Aleocharinae (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) fauna of New Brunswick and Canada including descriptions of 27 new species. 2016. Webster, R.P.; Klimaszewski, J.; Bourdon, C.; Sweeney, J.D.; Hughes, C.C.; Labrecque, M. ZooKeys 573: 85–216.

Year: 2016

Available from: Atlantic Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 36804

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.3897/zookeys.573.7016

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Abstract

This paper treats the discovery of new species and new records of aleocharine beetles for the province of New Brunswick. We report here 27 species new to science, one new North American record, six new Canadian records, and 29 new provincial records. The following are the new species: Acrotona brachyoptera Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. sphagnorum Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Atheta (Dimetrota) alphacrenuliventris Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) chartersensis Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) cranberriensis Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Atheta (D.) bubo Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) mcalpinei Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) makepeacei Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) giguereae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (D.) petitcapensis Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (sensu lato) pseudoschistoglossa Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (sensu lato) sphagnicola Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Atheta (sensu lato) thujae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., A. (Pseudota) pseudoklagesi Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Philhygra atypicalis Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Schistoglossa (Schis¬toglossa) pelletieri Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Thamiaraea corverae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., T. claydeni Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Pleurotobia bourdonae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., P. brunswickensis Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Agaricomorpha vincenti Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Gyrophaena (Gyrophaena) aldersonae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Oligota polyporicola Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., O. sevogle Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Hylota cryptica Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., Oxypoda sunpokeana Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n., and Phloeopora gilbertae Klimaszewski & Webster, sp. n. The spermatheca of Dinaraea curtipenis Klimaszewski & Webster, D. longipenis Klimaszewski & Webster, and D. subdepressa (Bernhauer) are illustrated for the first time. Male specimens of Mniusa odelli Klimaszewski & Webster were confirmed and are illustrated. Color habitus images and black and white images of the median lobe of the aedeagus, the spermatheca, and tergite and sternite VIII are provided for all species. New or additional habitat data are provided for most of the species treated in this contribution.

Plain Language Summary

Rove beetles are very species and occupy numerous microhabitats in forest ecosystems. This paper describes 63 species of rove beetles in the subfamily Aleocharinae (27 species new to science, 1 new North American record, 6 new Canadian records, and 29 new provincial records) and greatly improves our knowledge of beetle fauna in Canada. Baseline knowledge of our native insect fauna, i.e., the species that are present, their relative abundance, and the habitats in which they live, is critical if we want to measure changes that might occur due to future ecosystem disturbances. For example, the establishment and spread of an invasive forest insect like the emerald ash borer, which threatens to wipe out native species of ash in North America, may also have negative effects on populations of insect species that depend on ash trees. Nearly half of the rove beetle species reported in this paper (31 of 63 species) were collected in trapping experiments designed to develop improved tools for survey and detection of exotic and potentially invasive bark- and wood-boring beetles. In most trapping studies, “non-target” species collected in traps are ignored. However, we have taken advantage of the opportunity provided by our trap samples to identify non-target species in many beetle families, including the rove beetles, and thus improve the knowledge of beetle species diversity and distribution in Canada.