Canadian Forest Service Publications

Targeting cuticular components for pest management. 2016. Doucet, D.; Retnakaran, A. Pages 369-407 in Extracellular Composite Matrices in Arthropods, E. Cohen and B. Moussian, editors. Springer International Publishing.

Year: 2016

Available from: Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 37385

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-40740-1_10

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Abstract

The insect exoskeleton is present as a rigid structure above a monolayer of epidermal cells and together both form the integument. The cuticle is composed of an outer, multilayered epicuticle and an inner procuticle containing the chitinous exo- and endo- cuticle. The non-living cuticle is replaced during each instar to accommodate growth and development by sequentially degrading the old cuticle and replacing it with a new one. The entire molting cycle and the shedding of the old cuticle are precisely regulated by a series of endocrine and neuroendocrine cues. This chapter addresses the various cuticular components, cuticular metabolism and cuticular biogenesis regulatory systems that have been targeted for pest management. Major classes of synthetic compounds, including benzoylphenyl ureas, benzoyl hydrazines and etoxazole that target chitin synthesis and the molting cycle are presented. In addition, we focus on recent developments toward the targeting of additional components of the cuticle or processes of cuticle biogenesis that may find future applications in pest management.

Plain Language Summary

The insect exoskeleton is present as a rigid structure above a monolayer of epidermal cells and together both form the integument. The cuticle is composed of an outer, multilayered epicuticle and an inner procuticle containing the chitinous exo- and endo- cuticle. The non-living cuticle is replaced during each instar to accommodate growth and development by sequentially degrading the old cuticle and replacing it with a new one. The entire molting cycle and the shedding of the old cuticle are precisely regulated by a series of endocrine and neuroendocrine cues. This chapter addresses the various cuticular components, cuticular metabolism and cuticular biogenesis regulatory systems that have been targeted for pest management. Major classes of synthetic compounds, including benzoylphenyl ureas, benzoyl hydrazines and etoxazole that target chitin synthesis and the molting cycle are presented. In addition, we focus on recent developments toward the targeting of additional components of the cuticle or processes of cuticle biogenesis that may find future applications in pest management.

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