Canadian Forest Service Publications

Insects affecting regenerating conifers in Canada: Natural history and management. 2016. Alfaro, R., & Fuentealba, A. The Canadian Entomologist, 148(S1), pp. S111-S137.

Year: 2016

Available from: Pacific Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 38884

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.4039/tce.2015.50

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Abstract

A number of insect species in a variety of families and orders damage early regenerating forests. Successful management of pests of regenerating forests requires detailed information on the natural history of the damaging organism, including the factors that increase risk, and a careful assessment of the risk mitigation options. Decision support systems, in the form of stand models capable of incorporating pest management options are required to guide decisions in terms of the expected yields under various pest management scenarios. In this paper we review research to date on the natural history and damage of the most important insect pests of regenerating forests in Canada and propose a framework for risk assessment. Canadian scientists have been active contributors to the research that advanced this field, from the early descriptive studies, to the development of practical tools to assist industry in managing pests of young forests.

Plain Language Summary

Successful management of pests of regenerating forests requires detailed information on the biology of the damaging organism, including the factors that increase risk, and a careful assessment of the risk mitigation options. Decision support systems, in the form of stand models capable of incorporating pest management options are required to guide decisions in terms of the expected yields under various pest management scenarios. In this paper we review research to date on the biology and damage of the most important insect pests of regenerating forests in Canada and propose a framework for risk assessment. Canadian scientists have been active contributors to the research that advanced this field from the early descriptive studies to the development of practical tools to assist industry in managing pests of young forests.

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