Canadian Forest Service Publications

Rove beetles collected with carrion traps (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Quercus forest of Cerro de Garcia, Jalisco, and Quercus-pine and pine forests in other jurisdictions of Mexico. 2018. Rodriguez, W.D.; Navarrete-Heredia, J.L.; Klimaszewski, J. Zootaxa 4433: 457-477.

Year: 2018

Available from: Laurentian Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 39161

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.11646/zootaxa.4433.3.4

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Abstract

We present the species diversity of rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) collected with carrion baited traps in Quercus forests of Cerro de García, Jalisco, and provide a compilation of published species records in Quercus, Quercus-pine and pine forests in other jurisdictions of Mexico. This work includes taxonomic notes, information on species phenology, distribution, and their occurrence in Cerro de García (if applicable), and other jurisdictions of Mexico. In Cerro de García, 75 species were collected in total, of which 16 are shared with other Quercus forests in different locations, and 9 species are provided with new habitat data. The remaining individuals were only determined to morphospecies. In Mexico, there are 77 known species of rove beetles collected with carrion traps (determined to species or near species) and recorded from Quercus, Quercus-pine and pine forests. These species belong to 30 genera, 11 tribes and 10 subfamilies. This study provides biological information on Mexican rove beetles captured with carrion traps and highlights the importance of rove beetles as indicator species of habitat change for conservation analysis, forestry, agronomy and forensic sciences studies.

Plain Language Summary

In this article, the researchers discuss the diversity of staphylinid (rove beetle) species, insects belonging to the order Coleoptera, inhabiting the oak forests of the Cerro de Garcia hill in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. The researchers also provide a compilation of the species identified in the oak and pine forests of other Mexican states. This study includes taxonomical notes as well as information on the phenology of the species, their distribution, and their presence in these states.

The study provides biological information on the staphylinids of Mexico and hightlights the importance of these insects as indicator species of habitat change for various fields of study (agronomy, forestry).