Canadian Forest Service Publications

The North American Forest Database: going beyond national-level forest resource assessment statistics. 2018. Smith, W.B., Cuenca Lara, R.A., Caballero, C.E.D., Valdivia, C.I.G., Kapron, J.S., Reyes, J.C.L., Tovar, C.L.M., Miles, P.D., Oswalt, S.N., Salgado, M.R., Song, X.A., Stinson, G., Gaytán, S.A.V. Environ Monit Assess, 190: 350.

Year: 2018

Available from: Pacific Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 39201

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (request by e-mail)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.1007/s10661-018-6649-8

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Abstract

Forests cannot be managed sustainably without reliable data to inform decisions. National Forest Inventories (NFI) tend to report national statistics, with sub-national stratification based on domestic ecological classification systems. It is becoming increasingly important to be able to report statistics on ecosystems that span international borders, as global change and globalization expand stakeholders’ spheres of concern. The state of a transnational ecosystem can only be properly assessed by examining the entire ecosystem. In global forest resource assessments, it may be useful to break national statistics down by ecosystem, especially for large countries. The Inventory and Monitoring Working Group (IMWG) of the North American Forest Commission (NAFC) has begun developing a harmonized North American Forest Database (NAFD) for managing forest inventory data, enabling consistent, continental-scale forest assessment supporting ecosystem-level reporting and relational queries. The first iteration of the database contains data describing 1.9 billion ha, including 677.5 million ha of forest. Data harmonization is made challenging by the existence of definitions and methodologies tailored to suit national circumstances, emerging from each country’s professional forestry development. This paper reports the methods used to synchronize three national forest inventories, starting with a small suite of variables and attributes.

Plain Language Summary

This publication describes the first phase of an international effort to produce data on transnational forest ecosystems. Ecosystems don’t stop at international borders but too often our datasets and scientific assessments do. Canada, Mexico and USA have begun developing a harmonized North American Forest Database for managing forest inventory data, enabling consistent, continental-scale forest assessment and borderless ecosystem-level reporting. The first iteration of the database contains data describing 1.9 billion ha, including 677.5 million ha of forest. Data harmonization is made challenging by the existence of definitions and methodologies tailored to suit national circumstances, emerging from each country’s professional forestry development. This paper reports the methods used to synchronize three national forest inventories, starting with a small suite of variables and attributes.

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