Canadian Forest Service Publications

Temporal variation in abundance of male and female spruce budworms at combinatory associations of light traps and pheromone traps. Rhainds, M., Lavigne, D., Rideout, T., & Candau, J. N. (2019). Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 167(6), 526-533.

Year: 2019

Issued by: Atlantic Forestry Centre

Catalog ID: 40265

Language: English

CFS Availability: PDF (download)

Available from the Journal's Web site.
DOI: 10.1111/eea.12806

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Abstract

A 3‐year study (2014–2016) was conducted at Rocky Harbour near the west coast of Newfoundland, Canada, to record the abundance and phenology of adult spruce budworms captured at traps, using a factorial design (light traps and pheromone traps deployed contiguously or segregated spatially). Budworms were most abundant and occurred seasonally earlier in 2014 than in 2015 and 2016; these findings held generally true for males and females. The geographic setting of Newfoundland (large island isolated from the mainland by an oceanic barrier of >100 km across) provides an ideal location to discriminate local flight from long‐range immigrations; in our study, however, immigrations cannot be ruled out for any single day of trapping due to broad overlap in emergence patterns at Rocky Harbour relative to forest stands with known populations of budworms on the mainland. Based on moderate daily variation in adult abundance, however, major immigration events (defined as external deposition of budworms with large numerical amplitude) likely did not take place at Rocky Harbor between 2014 and 2016. Males were more abundant at light traps coupled with pheromone traps, whereas abundance of males at pheromone traps was similar with or without contiguous light traps. This outcome may be mediated by lower range of attraction for light traps (usually

Plain Language Summary

Light traps and pheromone-baited traps are the two most common sampling procedures for adult spruce budworms.  In this paper, we investigate in the field synergistic interactions between light traps and pheromone traps, both to develop improved monitoring tools for adult budworms, and to improve our knowledge of physiological responses of adults to olfactory and visual stimuli. Light traps and pheromone-baited traps are the two most common sampling procedures for adult spruce budworms.  In this paper, we investigate in the field synergistic interactions between light traps and pheromone traps, both to develop improved monitoring tools for adult budworms, and to improve our knowledge of physiological responses of adults to olfactory and visual stimuli.